Assuming the ball is hit squarely on the sweet spot of a wood bat...
Environment
Altitude
ft
Temperature
°F
Balls will travel farther in warmer temperatures.
Humidity
The overall effect of humidity is negligible. While it makes the air thinner (yup!) and allows the ball to fly farther, it also makes the ball softer and heavier. The two effects mostly cancel each other out.
Wind Speed
mph
Wind Angle
°
Expressed in degrees, with 0° meaning out to CF, 90° meaning left to right, 180° meaning in from CF, and 270° meaning right to left.
Gravity
ft/s2
Earth is 32.174, the moon is about 5.348, Jupiter is about 81.332.
Bat
Weight
oz
Major leaguers typically use 31-35 oz bats. Softball players use 26-30 oz bats.
Speed
mph
Major leaguers have bat speeds around 80 mph.
Ball
Weight
oz
Baseball: 5.125 oz
Softball: 6.5 oz
Golf Ball: 1.62 oz
Circumference
in
Baseball: 9.125 in
Softball: 12 in
Golf Ball: 5.28 in
COR
The higher the COR rating, the bouncier the ball and the farther it will fly.
Baseball: about 0.55
Softball: usually either 0.40, 0.44, or 0.47
Golf Ball: about 0.78
Compression
Balls with higher compression are harder and will fly farther. There is no standard compression for the baseball, but softballs are commonly 375 or 525 lb. Compression is not included in these calculations.
Speed of Pitch
mph
A 95 mph fastball will slow down to about 85 mph as it crosses the plate.
Contact
Height
ft
Angle
°
Angle the ball is hit, expressed in degrees, with 0° meaning flat and 90° meaning straight up.
Direction
°
Direction the ball is hit, expressed in degrees, with 0° meaning out to CF, 45° meaning down the right field line, and -45° meaning down the left field line.
Backspin
rpm
Backspin, expressed as a positive number, may increase a ball's carry in the air. Topspin is expressed as a negative number.
Sidespin
rpm
A positive number indicates counter-clockwise rotation when viewed from the top (typical when hit to LF), a negative number indicates clockwise rotation when viewed from the top (typical when hit to RF).
Results
hit it!
Some of the calculations are based on the Trajectory Calculator by Alan Nathan. Thanks to Alan for his assistance!
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